Workshops - Primary

Theme: Mathematical and Computational Thinking

P1 : Hands-on with computational thinking: Using CT strategies for teaching primary mathematics

Placeholder image

Professor Katie Makar

The University of Queensland
Australia


Biography. Katie Makar is the President of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia (MERGA) and Professor of Mathematics and Statistics Education at The University of Queensland, Australia. Professor Makar is co-director of the International Collaborative for Statistical Reasoning, Thinking and Literacy. Prior to her PhD, she was a classroom teacher for 15 years in USA, Malaysia and Nepal and holds a masters degree in pure mathematics.

Professor Makar’s classroom-based research explores primary teachers’ adoption over time of inquiry-based pedagogies to address complex, ambiguous problems in mathematics, statistics and more recently data science. The findings of her nationally-funded research over the past 15 years have led to multiple international awards due to its impact and pragmatic application in classrooms. Katie has been a consultant for the Queensland Department of Education, Australian Academy of Science and education companies in the USA and New Zealand. In these roles, she has co-designed curriculum materials and provided professional development for primary and secondary teachers to support learners’ knowledge transfer to contemporary problems that rely on mathematical and data-based evidence.


Abstract. In Singapore, the primary mathematics curriculum recognises that new approaches are needed to allow children and young people to harness the power of mathematics and data into the future. Deep understanding of mathematics and statistics develops through applying and adapting knowledge to unfamiliar problems. Computational thinking involves the use of high impact, transferable problem-solving skills used to address complex, ambiguous problems that will pervade future life and work. The teacher’s role in this process is essential in guiding students through the process and developing their confidence over time.

Following from the introduction in the keynote, this workshop will engage teachers in a fun, hands-on problem that they can use with their students to elaborate four aspects of computational thinking: decomposition, abstraction, pattern recognition and algorithmic thinking. I will outline a simple framework to design learning experiences in the classroom and draw out key strategies for teachers to support their students to tackle complex, contemporary problems that draw on mathematical and data-based evidence using computational thinking. Additional examples of problems from early years through middle school will be provided.

Target audience. Primary Mathematics Teachers

P2: Number sense and computational thinking in the primary mathematics classrooms

Placeholder image

Professor Berinderjeet Kaur

Mathematics and Mathematics Education AG
National Institute of Education
Nanyang Technological University
Singapore


Biography. Berinderjeet Kaur is a professor of mathematics education at the National Institute of Education (NIE), Nanyang Technological University. For the past 34 years, she has been involved in the pre-service and in-service education of mathematics teachers at NIE. She was awarded the Excellence in Teaching Commendation by NIE in 2005, 2006, 2018 and 2020. Her research on teaching and learning of mathematics and professional development of mathematics teachers has resulted in more than 300 publications. Her publications appear in both national and international journals, books and proceedings of meetings. She is the founding chair of the Mathematics Teachers Conference that is held annually by the Association of Mathematics Educators (AME) since 2005 in Singapore. She is also the founding editor of the Yearbook of AME published by World Scientific since 2009. This book is thematic and focuses on practice that is evidence based.


Abstract. Computational thinking is the process of understanding HOW a problem is solved. It can be explained plainly as thinking in the way a computer does. It is not only used to program software but also in our daily lives. As number sense is more than operations involving numbers, during this workshop we will work on tasks involving number relationships and engage in computational thinking and create algorithms

Target audience. Primary Mathematics Teachers

P3: Mathematical Thinking: From Thinking Skills to Thinking Classroom

Placeholder image

Dr Joseph Yeo Kai Kow

Mathematics and Mathematics Education AG
National Institute of Education
Nanyang Technological University
Singapore


Biography. Kai Kow Joseph YEO is a Senior Lecturer in the Mathematics and Mathematics Education Academic Group at the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He holds a PhD in mathematics education from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. As a teacher educator, he is involved in training pre-service and in-service mathematics teachers at primary and secondary levels and has also conducted numerous professional development courses for teachers in Singapore and overseas. Before joining the National Institute of Education in 2000, he held the post of Vice Principal and Head of Mathematics Department in secondary schools. His research interests include mathematical problem solving in the primary and secondary levels, mathematics pedagogical content knowledge of teachers, mathematics teaching in primary schools and mathematics anxiety. He has published several papers, book chapters and conference papers.


Abstract. Mathematical thinking is important as a way of learning mathematics. Mathematical thinking involves using mathematically rich thinking skills to understand ideas, discover relationships among the ideas, draw or support conditions about the ideas and their relationships and solve problem involving the ideas. Focusing on thinking skills in the primary mathematics classroom is crucial because it supports active cognitive processing which makes for better learning. Undeniably, mathematics educators and teachers would agree that lessons with thinking skills infused tend to emphasise more on pupils’ understanding the concepts behind the topics rather than rote learning. It indicates that the development of thinking skills and mathematics learning should not be taught separately. Examples of the different kinds of thinking skills are: classifying, sequencing, induction and deduction as well as analysing parts and whole. This workshop will explain and show how thinking skills could be infused in the teaching and learning of primary mathematics lessons. This workshop will also discuss how primary mathematics lessons are developed where thinking skills and conceptual understanding are explicitly and simultaneously pursued.

Target audience. Primary Mathematics Teachers


Copyright © MTC 2023 · All Rights Reserved